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Martin Welker

Graduate Student

418 Carpenter Building
University Park , PA 16802
Office Phone: (814) 867-0014

Curriculum Vitae

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Education

  1. 2015 M.A., Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University
  2. 2013 B.S., Anthropology, Utah State University

Biography

I am an environmental archaeologist specializing in zooarchaeology and biomorphometrics. I am especially interested in the use of quantitative big data analyses to explore aspects of human subsistence, the management and adaptation of domesticated animal species, and species translocation. My dissertation research centers on the detection of breeds in the archaeological record, and understanding how extreme phenotypic variation seen in domestic dogs reflects their roles within European and Native American societies. Included in my dissertation are an exploration of the ways in which colonial European preferences for large working dogs impacted the phenotypic variability in colonial dog populations (Rebecca Dunham -Parks Canada), and a validation study of ethnographically recorded travois and panner-style pack loads carried by Native American dogs (Dr. David Byers -Utah State University), I have ongoing projects investigating colonial European dietary patterns at the Fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia, early colonial cattle (Stéphane Noel -Laval University), and the spatial and temporal patterns of morphological variability in Native American dogs (Eric Jones -Wake Forest College). I am also actively involved in the analysis of material from Neolithic sites in Croatia (Dr. Sarah McClure). I also served as the field director for the 2015 and 2016 seasons of the Penn State Archaeological Field School at Foster Farm, a 19-20th century farmstead in Pennsylvania.

Dissertation

Identifying Breed Specialization and Use in European and Native American Domestic Dogs (Canis familiaris).

Dissertation Chair(s)

Dr. Sarah McClure

Research Interests

Human-Environmental Interaction, Colonization Events, Zooarchaeology, Morphometrics, Species Introductions, Environmental Modification/Land Use, Evolutionary Ecology, Human Behavioral Ecology